Resurrection | Other New Testament Writings

The following belongs to a series entitled “An Introductory Biblical Theology of Resurrection.” Read other posts belonging to this series here.

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Other New Testament Writings

Hebrews

The book of Hebrews calls “the resurrection of the dead” an “elementary doctrine” (6:1-3; see also 11:19, 35). The author presupposes Christ’s resurrection (i.e., 1:3-4; 12:1-2; etc.) and explicitly mentions it once (13:20). In His resurrection, Christ has destroyed the power of death and the devil (2:14-15). And whereas former priests suffered death (7:23), “by the power of an indestructible life” (7:16), Christ “holds his priesthood permanently” (7:24) because he “always lives to make intercession” (7:25).

1 Peter

For Peter, even amidst trials and tribulation (1:6), those who have been born again have a hope—not a dead, empty, or vain hope, but a genuine, living hope grounded in the living Christ, raised from the dead (1:3; cf. 1 Cor 15:17-19).[1] Likewise, “God purposed that people would put their faith and hope in him as a result of Christ’s work” (1:21).[2] Contrasting to spheres of existence,[3] Christ died with respect to the flesh—old order—but was raised with respect to the Spirit—new eschatological order (3:18). Through Christ’s resurrection, He has triumphed over demonic forces and is seated at the right hand of God (3:18-22).[4] And on the basis of Christ’s resurrection, believers appeal to God for a good conscience in Baptism (3:21).[5]

Revelation

The book of Revelation is properly the revelation of the risen Christ, the lamb who was slain (5:6, 12) and who has received a supreme, kingly position (1:5; an allusion is made to Ps 89:27, 37)[6] and authority over death (1:18) as result of His resurrection. But furthermore in Revelation, God’s two witnesses are killed (13:3-8); but after three and a half days they are resurrected (11:3-11). The first beast receives a deceiving false-resurrection (13:3, 12, 14). At Christ’s return the saints are raised (the “first resurrection”) to reign with Christ for 1,000 years (20:4-6; cf. Dan 7:22).[7] At the end of these 1,000 years, Death and Hades give up their dead who are then judged and cast into the lake of fire, which is the “second death” (11:18; 20:5, 11-15; 21:8). And finally, God ushers in the new heavens and new earth, at which point the final and ultimate defeat of death occurs (21:4).

Notes

[1] Thomas R. Schreiner, 1, 2 Peter, Jude (Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 2003), 62; Karen H. Jobes, 1 Peter (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2005), 85; Peter H. Davids, The First Epistle of Peter (Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1990), 52; contra. Wayne A. Grudem who interprets this text as teaching Christ’s resurrection as the means of rebirth (1 Peter [Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1988], 56).

[2] Schreiner, 1, 2 Peter, Jude, 89.

[3] Davids, The First Epistle of Peter, 137; Jobes, 1 Peter, 237–242.

[4] Schreiner, 1, 2 Peter, Jude, 179–198.

[5] Ibid., 193–197.

[6] G. K. Beale, The Book of Revelation: A Commentary on the Greek Text (Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1999), 190–191.

[7] The “martyrs” are a part representing the whole—all believers (Grant R. Osborne, Revelation [Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2002], 705).

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