Discussion Questions — Contemporary Sexualities & Gender Identities

The following is a list of discussion questions composed for a CrossWay Community Church small group, Christ & Culture, for use throughout November and December 2018.


Same-Sex Sexuality:

  • What does the Bible have to say about same-sex sexuality?
    • Is same-sex sexuality sinful?
    • What Biblical or theological questions do we have about this issue?
    • If someone is — as one might say — “born gay,” than how can we condemn their same-sex sexuality as sinful?
  • Can someone be same-sex attracted and Christian?
  • Is same-sex attraction a choice?
  • Is same-sex attraction itself sinful? Why is this distinction (if valid) important?
  • If someone is same-sex attracted and becomes a Christian, what should we expect their discipleship and sanctification to look like? For example, should we expect their same-sex attraction to go away? Why or why not?
  • Should same-sex attracted Christians embrace the label or self-identification of being gay (e.g., “gay Christian”)? Why or why not?
  • How should we evaluate the cultural phenomenon of linking one’s sexuality with one’s identity?
  • Are same-sex attracted individuals, by nature of being same-sex attracted, called to a life of celibacy?
  • What can we do as a church, as believers, to better help those in our midst or those in our community who are same-sex attracted? What has the church previously done well in this matter? Done poorly?
  • Many same-sex attracted Christians who choose a life of singleness can be susceptible to a sense of loneliness. How can we as a church help, encourage, and be more mindful of them?
  • Self-professing Christians disagree on this question — is homosexuality sinful? Is this an area where we can just “agree to disagree” and still maintain unity?
  • How can we help children (our own, or those in our church) navigate this topic in a culture that is increasingly affirming (and with insistence) of same-sex sexualities?
  • What should Christians make of “gay marriage”?
    • Should Christians support or oppose the legalization of gay marriage?
    • Should Christians attend their homosexual friends’ wedding ceremony?
    • Should Christians in certain professions (e.g., bakers, photographers) refuse to provide services for same-sex marriages?
  • How should we counsel someone who is in a homosexual marriage (according to law) and becomes a Christian?
  • How can we winsomely communicate our convictions to non-believers?

Transgenderism & Gender Dysphoria:

  • What should we make of “gender dysphoria”? Is transgenderism a choice, sin, disorder, and/or valid expression of self-understanding?
  • What does the Bible have to say, if anything, about gender dysphoria or transgenderism?
  • How can we help those experiencing gender dysphoria or self-identifying themselves as transgender?
  • Should we accommodate and use individuals’ “preferred pronouns” even if they conflict with their known biological sex?
  • How should we counsel someone who becomes a Christian and previously underwent sex reassignment surgery?
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Graham Cole on Christianity and Contemporary Sexualities: A Table Talk Prelude

This post was originally published at Rolfing Unshelved.


On Tuesday Cole delivered a “Dean’s Hour” lecture entitled “Following Christ in a LGBTIQQAAP’s World.” In many ways, this talk served as an introduction to the conversation that will continue at the Table Talk on October 21st.

In this post I’d like to relay some of the key points of this recent talk as a way to stimulate your thinking and prepare you for further conversation at our Table Talk.



First, Dr. Cole addressed the context in which we engage these matters.

(A) For many of us, these matters are extremely personal. Either we experience same-sex attraction ourselves or we know others–friends, family members–who do. We cannot engage this issue as a purely theoretical one.

(B) Furthermore, we engage this issue in a drastically changing culture, a culture of which the fast-past political changes are symptomatic. We live in a world in which these matters are cast as civil rights issues and opposition to them is addressed with a shaming rhetoric and ostracizing actions.

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