Differences in Translation Philosophies (Bible Translations, Ep. 3)

In this episode, Kirk and Dan illustrate some of the philosophical (or methodological) differences we find in the various translations. They also discuss some of the pros and cons of these differences.

Access the episode here (available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, and more).

See all other episodes in this series.

Redemption Accomplished and Applied, John Murray (Goodreads Review)

Redemption Accomplished and AppliedRedemption Accomplished and Applied by John Murray
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Lead a group of men in my church through this book. A lot of them found the initial chapters a bit more difficult to weigh through. I would agree that part 1 felt more polemical, and could feel a bit more technical or abstract for those less familiar with this sort of writing or subject matter. However, part 2 seems to take a shift in tone. In these latter chapters especially, one of the things I appreciated about this book was the doxological tone and orientation naturally woven throughout. As I read, I found myself experiencing gratitude to God and standing in awe of Christ. I believe this book originally came out of a series of lectures Murray delivered (?). And it certainly reads like that. It feels a bit different in that way from other systematic treatments of soteriology. Very insightful and well done.

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The Spectrum of Translation Philosophies (Bible Translations, Ep. 2)

Kirk and Dan continue their series on Bible translation by looking at the major reason for the differences in our available translations, namely, translation philosophy. We look at the difference between formal and dynamic equivalent methodologies, and where on the spectrum the various popular English translations tend to fall.

Access the episode here (available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, and more).

See all other episodes in this series.