Dwell — A Scripture Listening App


We live in a location and age where we have more access to the Bible than ever before. The entirety of the scripture is available to anyone with internet access. We can pull up the Bible on our iPhones with the simple touch of our passcode. And, of course, if we get “old school,” there’s printed Bibles. Some have estimated that there are upwards to 450 English translations of the Bible! And let’s not forget, before the invention of the printing press and the Protestant Reformation, which took strides towards putting God’s Word into people hands, this sort of access was unprecedented.

However, many folks today still struggle to read their Bible with any sort of regularity. A common refrain, probably the most commonly claimed hurdle: “I don’t have enough time.” We’re too busy (which is code for the fact that we fail to prioritize our time in God’s Word).

Audio Bibles are an incredible aid here, and a great supplement to needed “deep dive” time in the Word. With audio Bibles, you can listen to the Bible on your commute to work, while mowing the yard, or doing the dishes. And when you consider, that for a significant portion of church history, a primary way many people accessed their Bible was by hearing others read it to them (many christians haven’t been privileged enough to own their own personal Bibles), audio Bibles are a rather fitting and historically normal medium for Bible intake.

However, if you’re like me — a visual learner, who struggles retaining information or keeping focus while listening to things — you’ve probably found most audio versions of the Bible out there to be too unengaging and drab to be helpful. It’s like they lack personality. Or if they do have some personality, they’re melodramatic, awkward, or come in inconvenient formats (e.g., CD’s).

Enter the new scripture listening app, Dwell.

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RECOMMENDED: On Recovering a Practice of Devoting Ourselves to the Public Reading of Scripture (Article by Scott Newling)



I just read/listened to this article by Scott Newling, “Devoted to the public reading of Scripture,” advocating a recovery of the actual practice of devoting ourselves to the public reading of scripture in our churches.

As 1 Timothy 4:13 says,

Until I come, devote yourself to the public reading of Scripture….

Scott Newling says,

Let me be blunt: when we reduce the Bible reading in order to privilege something else in our meetings we are shifting the congregation’s understanding of what church is. When we choose not to read some bits because we deem them inappropriate, we forget that God wrote them—and that in his wisdom he knew what he was doing when he did. When we choose not to read parts because they seem irrelevant or unclear, we teach our congregations and ourselves that God’s word isn’t eternal or understandable. When we choose to not read the Old Testament because it is ‘unfamiliar’—how else are we going to get familiar with it? The non-Christian world certainly isn’t going to help us. If we find Scripture to be boring, it’s not God’s fault, and the solution isn’t to silence God! If we find a part boring, we must ask God to give us interest in it, because we love him and want to know what he has to say. The Bible is well aware that some bits are harder to understand than others (2 Pet 3:16-17). But where did we get the idea that the solution to this is to stop reading?

When we choose to reduce Bible readings for something else, do we then in effect say that our means, our words, are better than God’s to grow people?

I loved this article. It reflects a lot of my own convictions on the matter and thoughts I’ve been having for a little over a year now.

You can check it out over at Matthias Media’s The Briefing. Click here.