Redemptive-Historical Survey: 9 | The Monarchy & Davidic Covenant (LDBC Recap 4/3/16 Pt. 1)

 Explanation

logo-lake-drive-baptist-churchOn Sunday, January 24th, 2016, I began a Core Seminar on Redemptive History & Biblical Theology at my church, Lake Drive Baptist Church. During the course of this series I’ll be sending out emails recapping lessons and directing recipients to resources for further study.

Rather than just share these recaps with my church family, I’ve decided to share them here on the blog for anyone else who might be interested. I will be posting them occasionally over the next couple of months on a weekly basis or so.

See previous posts:

Recap/review

This week we looked at two stages in redemptive history: first, the monarchy and the covenant God made with David and his descendants; and, secondly, the wisdom literature and the psalms.

We begin the first installment of this week’s recap by surveying the role of the monarchy and Davidic covenant in redemptive history.

Overview of Biblical material

1 & 2 Samuel, 1 & 2 Kings, 1 & 2 Chronicles.

  • Israel rebelliously demands a king (1 Sam 8). God appoints Saul.
  • Saul disqualifies himself from kingship by disobedience.
  • David is appointed king and rules successfully, conquering much of the unconquered portions of the Promised Land and settling Israel securely in the land.
  • God makes the Davidic Covenant with David.
  • After David, Solomon becomes king. He oversees the building of the temple in Jerusalem.
  • After Solomon (David’s son), the kingdom is divided (1 Kgs 12:1-20).
    • The Northern Kingdom, known as “Israel,” composed of the 10 Northern tribes.
    • The Southern Kingdom, known as “Judah.”
  • During this period, these two divided kingdoms persist in rebellion and idolatry until eventually God punishes them both with exile. The kings, as leaders of the people, exemplify the evil behavior of the nation.
  • Whereas the Northern Kingdom sees much instability with regards to her kings (e.g., assassinations, regime changes, etc.), David’s dynasty remains unbroken in the Southern Kingdom.

Role within redemptive history

With the overview of the material in play, we now ask, how does this stage—specifically God’s promises in the Davidic Covenant—fit into redemptive history? How does God’s promises about a king relate to his purposes to bring about his new-creational kingdom?

We can summarize the role of this stage of redemptive history as follows: Through covenant-bound promises to David, God specifies how he will exercise his new-creational kingdom intent of reigning over as well as through his people: he will reign especially through kings from David’s line.

However, due to disbelieving disobedience, as exemplified in the splitting of the kingdom, God’s people continue to fail to experience the full extent of God’s new creational kingdom.

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Redemptive-Historical Survey: 8 | Entrance and Life in the Promised Land (LDBC Recap 3/20/16 Pt. 2)

Explanation

logo-lake-drive-baptist-churchOn Sunday, January 24th, 2016, I began a Core Seminar on Redemptive History & Biblical Theology at my church, Lake Drive Baptist Church. During the course of this series I’ll be sending out emails recapping lessons and directing recipients to resources for further study.

Rather than just share these recaps with my church family, I’ve decided to share them here on the blog for anyone else who might be interested. I will be posting them occasionally over the next couple of months on a weekly basis or so.

See previous posts:

Recap/review

We continue this week’s core seminar recap by reviewing the role of Israel’s entrance and initial life in the Promised Land in redemptive history.

Overview of Biblical material

Joshua, Judges, Ruth.

  • After the wilderness Generation died, Moses preaches the Law at the edge of the promised land (Deuteronomy). He prepare the next generation to enter the land.
  • The torch of national leadership is passed from Moses to Joshua.
  • Joshua leads the people into the land and they/God conquer.
  • Joshua distributes the land, much of which is yet to be conquered, to the twelve tribes.
  • But, although the land is promised to them, the tribes fail to fully possess the land given to them. Many of its original inhabitants are left.
  • Israel’s leadership enters into a stage of judges (e.g., Ehud, Barak, Gideon, Samson, etc.), who are far from godly leaders.
  • The time-period of the judges is characterized by…
    • (1) A lack of political stability:
      • No centralized government.
      • No king.
      • Israel is a group of loosely connected tribes.
      • Repeated oppression from surrounding nations.
    • (2) A lack of moral stability:

Sum: “In those days there was no king in Israel. Everyone did what was right in his own eyes” (Judges 21:25).

  • Israel repeats a cycle (see Judges 2:6-23):
    • (1) Disobedience/idolatry.
    • (2) Divine punishment in terms of oppression of nearby nations.
    • (3) Israel’s cry to God for help.
    • (4) God raising up a judge and providing deliverance.

Role within redemptive history

So, now, as always, we want to ask, how does this episode fit into redemptive history? How does this initial entrance and life in the land relate to God bringing about his covenant-bound new-creational kingdom purposes?

We can summarize its place as follows: Although God is faithful to his covenant-bound purposes to bring about his new-creational kingdom, God’s people only experience a partial realization of it due to disbelieving disobedience. Continue reading

Redemptive-Historical Survey: 7 | The Wilderness Wanderings (LDBC Recap 3/20/16 Pt. 1)

Explanation

logo-lake-drive-baptist-churchOn Sunday, January 24th, 2016, I began a Core Seminar on Redemptive History & Biblical Theology at my church, Lake Drive Baptist Church. During the course of this series I’ll be sending out emails recapping lessons and directing recipients to resources for further study.

Rather than just share these recaps with my church family, I’ve decided to share them here on the blog for anyone else who might be interested. I will be posting them occasionally over the next couple of months on a weekly basis or so.

See previous posts:

Recap/review

This week we covered the role of (1) the wilderness wanderings and (2) Israel’s entrance and initial life in the Promised Land in redemptive history.

We will break this week’s recap into two posts, one for each of those two “episodes.”

Overview of Biblical material

Numbers

  • From Sinai, where Israel received the Law, Israel continues towards the goal of God’s Exodus-deliverance—experience of the new-creational kingdom covenant blessings, esp. entrance into the Promised Land.
  • The people complain, and complain, and complain!
  • In unbelief (cf. the 12 spies incident) the people refuse to enter the Promised Land.
  • God responds by sentencing that entire generation (with the exception of Caleb and Joshua) to wander the rest of their lives in the wilderness. They will not experience the new-creational kingdom covenant blessings.
  • God supplies their needs during this time (e.g., manna, quail, water).
  • The people continue to complain and rebel.
  • But God remains true to his new-creational kingdom covenant purposes and prepares the next generation to enter the land (through a second giving of the Law, i.e., Deuteronomy [duet {two} + nomos {law}).

Role within Redemptive History

With that overview in place, we now want to ask, how do the wilderness wanderings fit into redemptive history? That is, how do they fit into God’s purposes of bringing about his new-creational kingdom?

  • Summary

We can summarize the role of the wilderness wanderings in redemptive history (the story of the outworking of God’s new-creational kingdom) this way: God’s people fail to enter God’s new-creational kingdom due to disbelieving disobedience. God postpones yet remains committed to his covenant-bound purpose of bringing about his new-creational kingdom.

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Redemptive-Historical Survey: 5 | The Exodus (LDBC Recap 3/6/16 Pt. 2)

Explanation

logo-lake-drive-baptist-churchOn Sunday, January 24th, 2016, I began a Core Seminar on Redemptive History & Biblical Theology at my church, Lake Drive Baptist Church. During the course of this series I’ll be sending out emails recapping lessons and directing recipients to resources for further study.

Rather than just share these recaps with my church family, I’ve decided to share them here on the blog for anyone else who might be interested. I will be posting them occasionally over the next couple of months on a weekly basis or so.

See previous posts:

Recap/review

We finish this week’s recap by reviewing the role the Exodus serves in redemptive history.

Overview of the Biblical Material

Exodus 1-18 Continue reading

Redemptive-Historical Survey: 4 | Abrahamic Covenant & the Patriarchs (LDBC Recap 3/6/16 Pt. 1)

Explanation

logo-lake-drive-baptist-churchOn Sunday, January 24th, 2016, I began a Core Seminar on Redemptive History & Biblical Theology at my church, Lake Drive Baptist Church. During the course of this series I’ll be sending out emails recapping lessons and directing recipients to resources for further study.

Rather than just share these recaps with my church family, I’ve decided to share them here on the blog for anyone else who might be interested. I will be posting them occasionally over the next couple of months on a weekly basis or so.

See previous posts:

Recap/review

This week we finished up our discussion on the Abrahamic Covenant and moved through the role of the Exodus in redemptive history. Since we completed coverage of two stages in redemptive history this week, we’ll have two parts to our recap. In this post (part one) we’ll review the Abrahamic Covenant.

Overview of Biblical material

Genesis 11:27-50:26

  • God calls out a man named Abram (eventually renamed Abraham) and makes a covenant[1]  with him and his descendants.[2] God is with Abraham and blesses him throughout his life.
  • Abraham and his wife Sarah miraculous have a child, Isaac, according to God’s specific covenant promise of numerous descendants.
  • As promised (Gen 17:7, 19, 21), God’s promise to Abraham is passed to his son Isaac (Gen 17:21; 26:1-6, 19-26) and then Isaac’s son Jacob (eventually renamed “Israel”—father of the nation of Israel [Gen 27:18-29; 28:10-16; 35:6-15]). God is with Isaac and Jacob and blesses them throughout their lives.
  • Through a great series of events, involving the selling of Jacob’s son, Joseph, into slavery and a great famine, Jacob (Israel) finds himself and his family in the land of Egypt. Again, God is with them and blesses them.

Role within redemptive history

We summarized the role of the Abrahamic Covenant (and, by extension, God’s dealing with select descendants of Abraham–the patriarchs–on account of this covenant being passed down to them) the following way: God initiates his new-creational kingdom plan in the form of covenant-bound promises to Abraham.

Continue reading