Redemptive-Historical Survey: 9 | The Monarchy & Davidic Covenant (LDBC Recap 4/3/16 Pt. 1)

 Explanation

logo-lake-drive-baptist-churchOn Sunday, January 24th, 2016, I began a Core Seminar on Redemptive History & Biblical Theology at my church, Lake Drive Baptist Church. During the course of this series I’ll be sending out emails recapping lessons and directing recipients to resources for further study.

Rather than just share these recaps with my church family, I’ve decided to share them here on the blog for anyone else who might be interested. I will be posting them occasionally over the next couple of months on a weekly basis or so.

See previous posts:

Recap/review

This week we looked at two stages in redemptive history: first, the monarchy and the covenant God made with David and his descendants; and, secondly, the wisdom literature and the psalms.

We begin the first installment of this week’s recap by surveying the role of the monarchy and Davidic covenant in redemptive history.

Overview of Biblical material

1 & 2 Samuel, 1 & 2 Kings, 1 & 2 Chronicles.

  • Israel rebelliously demands a king (1 Sam 8). God appoints Saul.
  • Saul disqualifies himself from kingship by disobedience.
  • David is appointed king and rules successfully, conquering much of the unconquered portions of the Promised Land and settling Israel securely in the land.
  • God makes the Davidic Covenant with David.
  • After David, Solomon becomes king. He oversees the building of the temple in Jerusalem.
  • After Solomon (David’s son), the kingdom is divided (1 Kgs 12:1-20).
    • The Northern Kingdom, known as “Israel,” composed of the 10 Northern tribes.
    • The Southern Kingdom, known as “Judah.”
  • During this period, these two divided kingdoms persist in rebellion and idolatry until eventually God punishes them both with exile. The kings, as leaders of the people, exemplify the evil behavior of the nation.
  • Whereas the Northern Kingdom sees much instability with regards to her kings (e.g., assassinations, regime changes, etc.), David’s dynasty remains unbroken in the Southern Kingdom.

Role within redemptive history

With the overview of the material in play, we now ask, how does this stage—specifically God’s promises in the Davidic Covenant—fit into redemptive history? How does God’s promises about a king relate to his purposes to bring about his new-creational kingdom?

We can summarize the role of this stage of redemptive history as follows: Through covenant-bound promises to David, God specifies how he will exercise his new-creational kingdom intent of reigning over as well as through his people: he will reign especially through kings from David’s line.

However, due to disbelieving disobedience, as exemplified in the splitting of the kingdom, God’s people continue to fail to experience the full extent of God’s new creational kingdom.

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Redemptive-Historical Survey: 1 | Creation (LDBC Recap 2/14/16 Pt. 2)

Explanation

logo-lake-drive-baptist-churchOn Sunday, January 24th, 2016, I began a Core Seminar on Redemptive History & Biblical Theology at my church, Lake Drive Baptist Church. During the course of this series I’ll be sending out emails recapping lessons and directing recipients to resources for further study.

Rather than just share these recaps with my church family, I’ve decided to share them here on the blog for anyone else who might be interested. I will be posting them occasionally over the next couple of months on a weekly basis or so.

See previous posts:

Recap/review

In this post we will recap our initial venture in surveying redemptive history, i.e., the role of creation in redemptive history.

The basic narrative of redemptive history

First, we recalled the basic narrative framework of redemptive history as a refresher. It can be presented as follows:

These four events are the central turning points in the all-encompassing storyline of scripture. But they leave a lot out (like all of God’s dealings with Israel!). Therefore, in this section of the course, as we survey redemptive history, we will unpack the contours and stages in between these four pillar-events.

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Gospel and Kingdom by Graeme Goldsworthy

In Gospel and Kingdom by Graeme Goldsworthy, two prominent argument-themes emerge. For that sake of organization, I’ll present this review according to those two categories.

The Kingdom Pattern

The fact that God acts in the history of men and interprets his acts means that these historical events will form a pattern that relates to the purpose of God [pg. 42].

And the central pattern that spans Biblical history, for Goldsworthy, is the concept of kingdom [42].

For Goldsworthy, the kingdom of God involves (a) God’s people, (b) in God’s place, (c) under God’s rule [53-54]. Both the content of the central Biblical covenants and the goal of redemption history is this kingdom of God [53]. Therefore, as an implication, under various Biblical covenants and within various eras of redemption history, different forms or stages of development of this kingdom exist on a trajectory ultimately consummating in the final realization of this kingdom in the Jesus Christ.

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Regeneration and the New Creation

An Introductory Biblical Theology of Regeneration as it Pertains to a Proper Understanding of Inaugurated Eschatology

In contrast to systematic theology, a discipline that tackles doctrines in a neat, organized, systematic, and generally atemporal fashion, Biblical theology seeks to examine Biblical themes through the lens of progressive revelation, that is, in light of scripture’s metanarrative or unfolding plotline. Biblically theology deliberately makes temporal sequence (time development) and Scripture’s broad storyline the grid through which theology, doctrines, and themes are studied and investigated.

The following post will seek to provide an introduction to a Biblical theology on regeneration as it pertains to a proper understanding of inaugurated (already initiated) eschatology (pertaining to “last things”).

If that sounds confusing, that’s okay; it’ll all makes sense in just a bit.

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