What Are Deacons? (CrossWay)


Key Passages: Passages that refer to “deacons,” using this word “servant” in a more official capacity to refer to a position within the church, are 1 Tim 3:8-13 and Phil 1:1. Other passages that possibly refer to deacons are Acts 6:1-7; Rom 16:1.

1 Timothy 3.8-13 – 8 Deacons likewise must be dignified, not double-tongued, not addicted to much wine, not greedy for dishonest gain. 9 They must hold the mystery of the faith with a clear conscience. 10 And let them also be tested first; then let them serve as deacons if they prove themselves blameless. 11 Their wives likewise must be dignified, not slanderers, but sober-minded, faithful in all things. 12 Let deacons each be the husband of one wife, managing their children and their own households well. 13 For those who serve well as deacons gain a good standing for themselves and also great confidence in the faith that is in Christ Jesus.

CrossWay’s Deacons & Elders Manual.

Ecclesiology (Church) in the Midst of a Pandemic (Coronavirus, Ep. 3)

As churches move online in the face of Sunday closures, it should cause us to ask, “What is the church in the midst of a pandemic?” Our current circumstances raise questions about what it means to be the church–questions that have always existed, with an underlying theology that’s always been at play, but are now being forced into our immediate purview in light of our situation.

Access the episode here (available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, and more).

See all episodes in this series.


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The Product of Pentecost: Birthmarks of the Newborn Church (Acts 2:41-47)

The Product of Pentecost: Birthmarks of the Newborn Church (Acts 2:41-47)
CrossWay Community Church
November 4th, 2018


Podcast link.

On the Interplay Between Congregational(ism) & Elder-Rule

The Issue:

The Bible teaches that elders are the governing office of the church. They are tasked with leading, managing, and overseeing. However, in the New Testament we find that the congregation is incredibly involved in the church’s affairs, and may, according to some, be seen as serving a governing role.

The question then is how these two things relate to each other. In many churches it is assumed that the elders lead, yet the congregation also exercises some expression of involvement or governance. So who leads (or governs), the elders or the congregation? And if both, how so? How do those two relate?

The below outline seeks to present various models of how this question is answered. It also seeks to present the various Biblical and theological content that potentially impinge upon this issue.

Assumption:

The Bible speaks to our ecclesiology. Polity is not a matter of Biblical indifference or a subject where the Bible leaves us open to organize ourselves as we like (contra. other traditions). We believe the sufficiency of scripture extends to the fact that the Bible guides us on how we as a church are to be governed.

This is why we look to scripture on these matters. We look to them for instruction here. Its voice is what determines our polity. Continue reading