The Authority of Scripture (On Scripture with Mark Ward, Ep. 2)

Mard Ward and Kirk Miller continue their discussion on scripture by asking, What does it mean for Scripture to be our authority? And how does it exercise its authority?

Access the episode here (available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, and more).

See all other episodes in this series.


This episode is brought to you by Logos Bible Software, with special discounts available to listeners of this podcast.

The Canonicity of Scripture (On Scripture with Mark Ward, Ep. 1)

Mard Ward joins Kirk to discuss the topic of canon, “the divinely authorized collection of books that God has given to govern his people” (John Frame). How do we know we have God’s Word? Why these books?

Access the episode here (available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, and more).

See all other episodes in this series.


This episode is brought to you by Logos Bible Software, with special discounts available to listeners of this podcast.

The Reformation as a Movement of the Scripture

The printing press was invented in 1440, allowing written works — like the Bible — to be widely produced and distributed.

Desiderius Erasmus’ Greek New Testament of the Bible, the first of its kind to be made, was published in 1516, facilitating the movement “ad fontes,” and a close examination of scripture in its original language.

The Protestant Reformation kicked off contemporaneously, circa 1517.

Coincidence? I think not.

When the Word of God is unleashed, expect theological reform.

At the heart of the Reformers’ agenda was to put the scriptures into the hands and ears of the people. Contrast that with the Roman Catholic Church, who, at the time, forbid preaching or translating the Bible into the common language. (Of what were they afraid?)

The Reformation was a movement of the scriptures.

#500Reformation

Abridged Bible Reading Plan

The following is an abridged Bible reading plan I developed in ministry at South City Church.

This plan is not intended to replace reading through the entire Bible; but, rather, is to serve as a more accessible starting point for those who are unacquainted with scripture. The hope is that those who use this plan would gain a basic understanding of scripture’s central message along with its key themes, structure, and movements, and, after having done so, would be better equipped to read through the scriptures in their entirety.


Download PDF of Abridged Bible Reading Plan.

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Key Bible and Theological Reference Tools: English Translations

This post is a re-blog of my post at Rolfing Unshelved.


This post is part of a series entitled Key Bible and Theological Reference Tools. This series seeks to provide one with an introduction to some key Biblical and theological reference tools. In this series one will find basic explanations, significant examples, and other information about these reference tools.


Basic Description

English Bible translations are publications that seek to faithfully render the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek text of the Bible in the English language.